A lot of attention will be focused on Wisconsin today as Republican Gov. Scott Walker faces a recall vote, facing Democratic challenger Tom Barrett.

English: Scott Walker on February 18, 2011
English: Scott Walker on February 18, 2011 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In some of the latest polling, Walker holds a slight lead against the Milwaukee mayor, ranging anywhere from 2-7 percent.  Barrett has raised $4 million, but that pales in comparison to the amount that Walker’s campaign has raised nationally.  Walker’s war chest has outgained Barrett’s by a 7-to-1 ratio.

That’s really what it comes down to anymore, isn’t it?  He/She who raises the most money wins, in this era of Citizens United and money representing a voice more than actual human voices.

That’s a bit of what we’re looking at today, part of what’s attracting that national attention to Wisconsin.  Will the size of the campaign contributions and the PR clout that can come with it truly decide which direction Wisconsin goes with its leadership?

Will Scott Walker’s push to “divide and conquer” truly win the day?

The late comedian George Carlin — an equal opportunity hypocrisy despisor if there ever was one, regardless of political party — said it brilliantly about “divide and conquer” before Walker ever uttered the words himself.

Last Words (book)
Last Words (book) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Now, to balance the scale, I’d like to talk about some things that bring us together, things that point out our similarities instead of our differences.  ‘Cause that’s all you ever hear about in this country.  It’s our differences.

“That’s all the media and the politicians are ever talking about — the things that separate us, things that make us different from one another.  That’s the way the ruling class operates in any society.  They try to divide the rest of the people.

“They keep the lower and the middle classes fighting with each other so that they, the rich, can run off with all the f*****g money!  Fairly simple thing. Happens to work.  You know?  Anything different — that’s what they’re gonna talk about — race, religion, ethnic and national background, jobs, income, education, social status, sexuality, anything they can do to keep us fighting with each other, so that they can keep going to the bank!

“You know how I define the economic and social classes in this country?  The upper class keeps all of the money, pays none of the taxes.  The middle class pays all of the taxes, does all of the work.  The poor are there just to scare the s***t out of the middle class. Keep ’em showing up at those jobs.”

Before we forget where it seems that Gov. Walker’s loyalties really seem to rest, maybe we should revisit a recording that was made last year when he took part in a phone conversation with someone who he thought was billionaire contributor David Koch checking in to see how the effort to crush public employees’ unions and end collective bargaining was going when patience with Walker in the eyes of the public was wearing thin.

No, it’s not a crime to talk on the phone with a billionaire political contributor.  It does seem to show Walker’s true character, which should be troubling to those everyday people who think their voices and their votes make a difference.

It’s governing through bank accounts, just what Citizens United gave to us.

And just what have those bundles of conservative cash that the Walker campaign has brought in bought in this campaign to fight the recall effort?

The question today, in Wisconsin and elsewhere, is this:  Will voters buy into the money and keep Scott Walker as governor, potentially making him a political superstar, allowing the strategy of “divide and conquer” to rule the day?

Stay tuned.

Copyright 2012, Daddysangbassdude Media

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4 thoughts on “What goes on in Wisconsin …

  1. Nicely stated, John! The sane believers here are praying, the sane non-believers are doing their version of praying (called “fervently wishing”), and I’m off to vote in an hour.

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